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  1. #1
    Bluemchen is offline Sprouter
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    Default Blueberries in neutral soil??

    I've got 6 plants that need planting on my allotment this winter. I'm reluctant to put them in pots, as they do like their feet wet and it is a real tie to have pots needing watering daily, or more down at my allotment.

    I understand they like acid soil, and so my plan is as follows:dig a big hole and fill it with ericaceous compost and sand (50:50 mix), then plant them in there. I thought I would use flowers of sulphur (or an organic equivalent) to scatter around the soil area surrounding the holes I've dug, so the surrounding area will acidify gradually too. I was going to mulch with pine bark and water with rainwater.

    Is this stupidity itself? Has anyone any experience or ideas for me??

    Many thanks.
    Bluemchen

  2. #2
    adrian901 is offline Germinator
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    Here is a link to a really good post on blueberry cultivation and how to grow blueberries

    However as a rule you it is easier to keep the soil acid in a raised bed

    Good luck

    Ade

  3. #3
    beridor is offline Germinator
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    Hi,

    I just wondered how you got on over the last two years - I've just planted up six plant smyself in the same way that you described, I think that I need to throw something on it to make it more acidic and wondered whent you found to be the best in the end.

    Cheers

    Dave

  4. #4
    FB.'s Avatar
    FB.
    FB. is offline Early Fruiter
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    Default

    There are a few options:

    Plant in open ground, but use ericaceous or acid mulches to lower the pH.

    Plant the (large) pots in the ground - they don't dry out as quickly as when they sit on your patio because they are cooler and the soil deep down (just below the pots) still retains moisture, which slows the drainage from the pots.

    Dig a pit, line with old plastic sacks, but leave the sacks a few inches below ground level so that the top few inches of soil can drain, while the deeper soil is almost like pond sludge; really soggy. My blueberries loved this method.


    ...................

    Planting in open ground can mean too much soil moisture variation.

    Planting in a sack-lined pit has been my best method so far.

    I am re-testing them planted in 10/12 litre pots set in the ground this year.

  5. #5
    BUFFS is offline Early Fruiter
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Bluemchen View Post
    I've got 6 plants that need planting on my allotment this winter. I'm reluctant to put them in pots, as they do like their feet wet and it is a real tie to have pots needing watering daily, or more down at my allotment.

    I understand they like acid soil, and so my plan is as follows:dig a big hole and fill it with ericaceous compost and sand (50:50 mix), then plant them in there. I thought I would use flowers of sulphur (or an organic equivalent) to scatter around the soil area surrounding the holes I've dug, so the surrounding area will acidify gradually too. I was going to mulch with pine bark and water with rainwater.

    Is this stupidity itself? Has anyone any experience or ideas for me??

    Many thanks.
    Bluemchen
    you could use compost thats been rotted down with a high percentage of citric fruit peel (shred it to speed it up),i have used it for 3 years now and it makes a hell of a difference in my neutral/slightly acid soil ,and as we like plenty of oranges and maybe a few lemons on pancake day, it really is a win win solution for us, as blueberries are so fussy,i originally did it for my bonsai,the fruit side is a bonus,but what a bonus......

  6. #6
    Norm's Avatar
    Norm is offline Rooter
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    If you can get your hands on fresh chicken muck (not the pelleted stuff), leave it to compost for 3 or 4 months, then dig that in around your plants, that'll keep the soil acidic. Don't use it fresh, or it'll burn the roots off. Keeping peat based compost wet is pretty acidic too.
    http://norm-foodforthought.blogspot.com/

    If it ain't broke, don't fix it and if you ain't going to eat it, don't kill it

  7. #7
    Potstubsdustbins's Avatar
    Potstubsdustbins is offline Gardening Guru
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    I obtained my first blue berry last year and loved the small amount of fruit we got.

    I have read somewhere that I should have two plants to aid pollination could someone confirm this please and also should they be the same variety or different.

    Many thanks Colin

  8. #8
    BUFFS is offline Early Fruiter
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    better with a different variety,bit like apples i suppose..
    Last edited by BUFFS; 05-03-2011 at 07:01 PM.

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