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Thread: Apple tree on allotment - what’s wrong with them?

  1. #9
    Swag is offline Germinator
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    Bingo. Thanks. It was too big initially
    veggiechicken likes this.

  2. #10
    ameno is online now Rooter
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    That's bitter pit.
    It's caused by insufficient calcium while fruit is growing, although this is usually caused by dry soil, rather than lack of soil calcium.
    Some varieties are more prone to it than others.
    There's nothing you can do this year, although they're still edible, if you cut out the brown bits.

    Next year, it may pay to water in long dry periods. Although having said that, doing so is only really practical with relatively small trees. Large trees need more water than you would be realistically capable of supplying.
    If it's a large tree and it continues to be a problem year on year, you may need to consider just getting rid of it, maybe replacing it with a less susceptible variety.
    Right Shed Fred likes this.

  3. #11
    Lardman is offline Rooter
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    Looks more like scab than bitter pit to me.

  4. #12
    ameno is online now Rooter
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lardman View Post
    Looks more like scab than bitter pit to me.
    Those dark areas are sunken, which is indicative of bitter pit. Scab is raised and, well, scabby.

  5. #13
    FB.'s Avatar
    FB.
    FB. is online now Early Fruiter
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lardman View Post
    Looks more like scab than bitter pit to me.
    My first thought was 'could be both scab and bitter pit together' but it needs some larger and closer pictures with light shining on the fruit rather than behind the fruit.

    It's been a bad year for scab on pears (not sure how badly apples are affected - my apples rarely get scab) and a bad year for bitter pit on susceptible varieties or susceptible rootstocks (i.e. rootstocks which don't cope well with dry conditions).

    As I've mentioned before, I find trees grafted onto M25 rootstock seem to be less prone to bitter pit.
    .

  6. #14
    Snadger's Avatar
    Snadger is online now Dundiggin
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    Whatever it is, my apples also have it. I have never had it before and the crop is only about a quarter the size it usually is.

    Hopefully next year will be better.
    My Majesty made for him a garden anew in order
    to present to him vegetables and all beautiful flowers.- Offerings of Thutmose III to Amon-Ra (1500 BCE)

    Diversify & prosper



  7. #15
    Florence Fennel's Avatar
    Florence Fennel is offline Gardening Guru
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    Me too but I have hundreds! What can I do to prevent this next year?
    Granny on the Game

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