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Thread: Lemon Tree in big trouble

  1. #9
    Jimny14 is online now Rooter
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    We have a lemon which we won from the outlaws (would say in laws but we're not married) a few years ago as it was enjoying itself in their dining room in summer but was starting to sulk during winter. We brought it up the road to our orangery which we use as an occasional dining room during winter but at other times it stays unheated apart from a heater set to come on if temp gets below about 8-10c (lemons are supposedly hardy to 5ish) to keep damp down in the room. We have found it works really well, we reduce watering down in the winter (keeping it just moist) and tend not to feed over winter, just start feeding again about late April and give a last feed around when it starts cooling down and threatening frosts outside. It has gone outside for summer last couple of years but has managed to get itself infested with scale insect (that reminds me I must go wash the lemon tree).
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  2. #10
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    scarey55 is offline Killer Klare
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    Quote Originally Posted by Scarlet View Post
    Mine died after a few years in the Summer after forgetting to water!
    Shame I don't really expect mine to survive, I'm notoriously bad at keeping plants like that but OH wanted it

    The funniest thing is me running outside in a rainstorm in my pj's trying to catch all available rainwater during the summer to use when it was dry. As you will remember, we didn't get much rain this year.
    Last edited by scarey55; 28-11-2018 at 09:45 AM. Reason: to change my appalling grammar!
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  3. #11
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    Scarlet is online now O'Hara
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    Quote Originally Posted by scarey55 View Post

    The funniest thing is me running outside in a rainstorm in my pj's trying to catch all available rainwater.
    Postman just caught me in my PJ's, no socks and slippers pruning my mock orange
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  4. #12
    BrightST is offline Banned
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    For reviving your citrus tree you should develop a regular watering schedule, and check the moisture of the soil before watering... It's a real challenge, good luck!

  5. #13
    JT101 is offline Germinator
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    Thanks for the responses everyone. I will try a few different things.

    The larger more mature tree with fruits which had the spider mites, got blasted again with the hose which again removed most of the spider mites. I then sprayed it with a homemade mixture of vinegar, oil, soap and water. I think I can still see some mites on there, but they don't seem to be moving so presumably I suffocated them.

    Left it for a few days, and was still dropping leaves like mad, so I've moved it from the north facing cold extension with radiators, to the upstairs south facing front bedroom, and turned the radiators off.

    So hopefully this reduction in uneven heating, and more daylight will help. Will see.

    Scarlet mentions watering from the bottom, but surely this means the tree is sitting in water, and citrus trees aren't supposed to like wet feet so not sure how you get round that.

    Everyone goes on about summer vs winter food, and yet baby bio citrus feed is highly rated and claims to be used winter/summer. This is what I've been using. Additionally Jimny14 doesn't feed his at all.


    In answer to Nickdub, I am in London. Suburban terraced house, south facing with a decent sized garden to the rear.

    The reason I brought the trees indoors was fear of frost damage. I do have a lean to attached to a brick built garage which is my final option if the tree still suffers

    I used a data logger to measure temp and relative humidty over a couple of days in this current relatively mild weather.

    Backroom north facing extension 14 20C, 71 95% RH
    Upstairs front south facing bedroom 19 22C, 65-68% RH
    Glazed lean to attached to brick garage south facing 5 13.5C, 85-90% RH


    I'm sure I read that citrus plants require 50% and above RH, and the temperature in the front bedroom doesn't fluctuate as much as the other two locations, so it seems it would be ideal.

    Sunrise today was 7:45 and sunset 4pm, so it would seem it's getting the recommended 6-8hrs daylight.

  6. #14
    Scarlet's Avatar
    Scarlet is online now O'Hara
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    Well I've not used the baby bio version so I don't know how good it is....but plants do have different requirements at different times of the year/ flower/fruiting/leaf production often require different nutrient amounts.
    I used this https://www.homebase.co.uk/vitax-cit...r-200g_p413558
    But as I haven't tried the baby bio / tested them side by side Etc I wouldn't know how well each work.

    Watering from the bottom - you pour water in the tray and let the plant suck up what it needs - tip the excess out. Or sit the plant in the sink until you can feel the weight change. Don't leave it sitting in a tray of water that it hasn't absorbed.
    Last edited by Scarlet; 02-12-2018 at 08:30 PM.

  7. #15
    Kirk is offline Cropper
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    Lemons are actually fairly hardy so if London and if you do not get a frost it might be OK outside all year, an unheated green house or similar would help.

    Red spider mite are a problem, also vine weevels are a problem. I found on mine I had to get "rough". Good spray soaking with an insecticide, and a 100% soak of the compost with a vine weevel solution. Then repeat both again after a week or two.

    Watering - mine gets a half can twice a week, 2.5 litre plastic watering can, not evenly spread but when I remember. Always recall everything I had indoors grew best when I worked away all week. They got a good watering on a Friday when I returned and another on a Sunday when I departed. Never decided if they like the regime or like the absence of me.

    They do not like being moved, and usually throw leaves in protest.

    I am presently working on how to repot a lime that fill a window from top to bottom and across the width but it has 9 limes on it and I don't really want to have them fall off in protest.
    Last edited by Kirk; 08-12-2018 at 10:40 PM.
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  8. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jimny14 View Post
    we reduce watering down in the winter (keeping it just moist) and tend not to feed over winter, just start feeding again about late April and give a last feed around when it starts cooling down and threatening frosts outside..
    Quote Originally Posted by JT101 View Post

    Everyone goes on about summer vs winter food, and yet baby bio citrus feed is highly rated and claims to be used winter/summer. This is what I've been using. Additionally Jimny14 doesn't feed his at all.
    Just to clarify, Jimny does feed - but not over winter.

    I had a lemon once, it survived a couple of years, produced one lemon, had lots of sooty mould so I put it outside as punishment. It died.
    Make 2019 the Year of Random Seed sowing
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