Grow Your Own Magazine

Navbar button growfruitandveg.co.uk Logo
Forum Navigation

+ Reply to Thread
Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 9 to 16 of 24
Like Tree11Likes

Thread: taking the fruit tree plunge

  1. #9
    4Shoes's Avatar
    4Shoes is online now Cropper
    Join Date
    Sep 2017
    Location
    Wigtownshire
    Posts
    1,129
    Blog Entries
    11

    Default

    Pollination partner.

    Should have said that the partner can be same and one either side.

    For apples I think they us A, B, C, D, E - Each letter (or number) represents a week, so if there was an Egremont Russet on site. It is a group B, you could consider a Scotch Dumpling (A) or a Discovery (C)


    NB... Some growers use numbers 1,2,3,4,5

  2. #10
    FB.'s Avatar
    FB.
    FB. is offline Early Fruiter
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Cambridgeshire, UK
    Posts
    4,499

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by 4Shoes View Post
    Pollination partner.

    Should have said that the partner can be same and one either side.

    For apples I think they us A, B, C, D, E - Each letter (or number) represents a week, so if there was an Egremont Russet on site. It is a group B, you could consider a Scotch Dumpling (A) or a Discovery (C)


    NB... Some growers use numbers 1,2,3,4,5
    There even seem to be two versions of the alphabetical blossoming times.
    One uses A-F (and would put Court Pendu Plat in group F) while the other uses A-H (and would put CPP in group H).

    Others use the figures for the NFC trees which shows the most likely days the variety will flower in Kent.
    For example: Discovery is shown as peak flower around 12th May, with some viable flowers usually present from 7th-19th May (the average start and end dates for its flowers to open).

    However, flowering times and pollination is an immensely complex subject, affected by location, soil type, shading, weather, tree age, tree size, rootstock and more.

    In most areas apples seem to be pollinated acceptably well.

    Location:
    Trees in milder areas tend to blossom earlier. Trees in windy locations may have their blossoms damaged or the bees may be deterred from flying to the tree because bees don't like wind either.

    Soil type:
    Heavy soils remain cold for longer so trees are slower to get going. Light soils warm up faster and trees come to life earlier.

    Shading:
    Affects soil temperatures in similar ways to cooler regions or shaded ground.

    Weather:
    Each variety has an optimum temperature for its flowers and pollen; a few degrees too warm or too cool and the pollen and/or flowers can have poor viability even if it's not frosty.

    Tree age and size:
    Older, larger trees usually open the flowers on their oldest wood first, while the youngest shoots can be a week or so later to open their flowers. Therefore older, larger trees flower over a longer period of time, increasing their value as a pollinator but also increasing their chances of being pollinated or of not losing al their blossom to a few frosty nights.

    Rootstock:
    Some rootstocks encourage the scion to come out of dormancy earlier than the same variety other rootstocks.

    Triploid:
    Personally, I think most triploids are reasonably self-fertile - more self-fertile than most diploids.
    .

  3. #11
    FB.'s Avatar
    FB.
    FB. is offline Early Fruiter
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Cambridgeshire, UK
    Posts
    4,499

    Default

    As for what to plant:

    Varieties which are tasty but which can't be found easily in the shops or markets.
    M26 rootstock.
    Varieties that are well-behaved and not too vigorous.
    .

  4. #12
    bikermike is offline Tuber
    Join Date
    Nov 2017
    Location
    North London frontier
    Posts
    889

    Default

    thanks all - I am taking notes. Hoping to do the deed soon.

  5. #13
    FB.'s Avatar
    FB.
    FB. is offline Early Fruiter
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Cambridgeshire, UK
    Posts
    4,499

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by bikermike View Post
    thanks all - I am taking notes. Hoping to do the deed soon.
    Once you've decided but before you buy, it would be a good idea to update this topic to see if anyone has any useful comments to make - maybe someone has good or bad experiences of what you choose.
    .

  6. #14
    Join Date
    Mar 2017
    Location
    Isle of Man
    Posts
    415

    Default

    Have a tri variety apple tree on normal rootstock and pleased with it, especially as only room for one apple tree. Longer harvest, lots of variety when eating, one wont keep but lovely to eat, another will but more like a shop apple to eat. Pruning simple to keep even and it has the goblet shape by default from the tri graft point. May also get cross polliantion. Wondering if could graft a walnut onto a walnut to help pollination for one tree
    However no idea how duo or tri work out on a dwarf rootstock

  7. #15
    nickdub is online now Early Fruiter
    Join Date
    Jul 2017
    Location
    Ross-on-Wye
    Posts
    2,163

    Default

    I'd think grafting on another variety of walnut would be possible.

    Two factors to bear in mind :-
    1) the main mechanism for pollen transport is the wind, so the graft should be high up in the tree.
    2) female flowering times and the production times of catkins would need to be paired, so you'd need to research the varieties.

  8. #16
    Kirk is offline Cropper
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    S Cambs/N Herts
    Posts
    1,381

    Default

    I've seen a number of things, and wondered what the view was
    1) double-grafted (ie two varieties of pear on one root-stock) - do they last? will they need more attention?
    2) traditional varieties - these look to be more complicated (not self-fertile) with a lower yield
    3) pears advertised as self-fertile - is this possible (absent of growing two sorts on one tree).
    Double or triple grafted will take more care as grafts that are similar otherwise one takes over.
    Traditional are no real problem. I have found that pollination groups are somewhat arbituary, Whatever I planted they seemed to flower in a different order - except a LATE variety that was actually late flowering.
    Pears unsure of but thought they were generally bigger the apples and needed longer to produce. The old saying was you planeted pears for you heirs.

    Rootstock I found M9 the most reasonable for apples.

    If you wanted different try Ken Muir, they do minarette apples and fruit. Basically a upright stick form of tree. They cost more however and I have no idea how good they really are. Pictures look impressive but they are not going to show one with 2 or 3 apples on it.

    Had mine grafted at Brogdale.
    Keepers seems to be a good source.
    Last edited by Kirk; 09-11-2018 at 01:52 PM.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts