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Thread: The Unusual Fruit Garden Plant Collection

  1. #33
    veggiechicken's Avatar
    veggiechicken is online now Gardening Guru
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    more pics of the tree at work, which comparing to mulberries online certainly seems to be the case, now to decide if I can squeeze in and train a mulberry tree seeing as it was the taste of them that made me do my fruit garden

    The Unusual Fruit Garden Plant Collection-img_9286.jpg
    The Unusual Fruit Garden Plant Collection-img_9288.jpg
    The Unusual Fruit Garden Plant Collection-img_9289.jpg

    Really can't wait for this to fruit again, I discovered them far too late last year, no-one will get a look in this year

  3. #35
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    Nice list there UFG. Where abouts are you based?

    I had thought about Saskatoons but never got round to growing them. May be its the suckering that held me back.

    Now I'm not one to really go for unusual crops but what about Lingonberries, figs, golden currants, choke berries, Himalayan Honeysuckle, grapes, black/red/pink/white currants, gooseberries, pomegranates?

    Or theres bilberries, Worcesterberry, Dead Mens Fingers/Blue Sausage Tree, Flying Dragon (
    Citronnier épineux 'Dragon Volant')?
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    I really need to let things off the list develop first rather than adding more as I have very little space left without completely ripping up my garden and starting all over, I am looking into the possibility of an allotment though so if one of those comes up, I'll be looking for more things to try. I'm in the north east between Durham & Middlesbrough. I thought Lingon but heard the Tayberry is just a sweeter variety, I don't want anything too tarty as I like sweet berries I can pluck and eat, I don't intend to make jams or anything unless I get overwhelmed and thats wishful thinking at the moment, I do need to figure out how to get a mulberry in though, that is the next priority

  5. #37
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    Lingonberries are nothing like tayberries. One is a low, evergreen shrub, the other grows like a raspberry or blackberry.
    Its also nothing like a mulberry!
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  6. #38
    TrixC is offline Rooter
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    Your fruit garden sounds great!

    With mulberries you need to be aware that they are quite large trees with a spreading habit - bigger than an apple tree for example. They live for hundreds of years and the traditional varieties will take 5-10 years to fruit - it sounds like some of the new dwarf and everbearing varieties may be quicker but people also say they’re not as tasty. Some people claim you can grow them in pots but I’ve not seen an example of this and given the size of the tree I’m very sceptical it could fruit well in a pot. The fruit is delicious but it’s not really practical unless you have a large garden and are prepared to be patient.
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    Quote Originally Posted by veggiechicken View Post
    Lingonberries are nothing like tayberries. One is a low, evergreen shrub, the other grows like a raspberry or blackberry.
    Its also nothing like a mulberry!
    My bad, my eyes read loganberry which I've heard is similar, I do actually have a lingonberry, supposed to be similar to cranberry, I only bought 1 in a 9cm pot to see what they were like and it arrived with 3 little berries on. I keep forgetting about it as thats in a pot out of sight/mind for now and not in my raised beds.

    Quote Originally Posted by TrixC View Post
    Your fruit garden sounds great!

    With mulberries you need to be aware that they are quite large trees with a spreading habit - bigger than an apple tree for example. They live for hundreds of years and the traditional varieties will take 5-10 years to fruit The fruit is delicious but it’s not really practical unless you have a large garden and are prepared to be patient.

    I know the tree's take time, I can wait one out as I have access to a huge one at work which everyone ignores (for now but I was turning heads picking fruit last year). I also found the location of another through an online mulberry tree finder map so I shouldn't have a shortage while waiting for a tree to come good

  8. #40
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    How about trying to grow a mulberry plant from seed, TUFG? They're apparently a bit tricky to germinate, but you'll be able to get plenty of seeds to try with when it fruits again. Or you might find a few self-sown seedlings growing under or around the tree. Seedlings would stay quite small for a couple of years and be easy to move when you relocate.

    By the way, it looks like a black mulberry. I discovered a tree in our local park when I was a kid and remember the berries being tasty. There is also a white mulberry but I've read that it doesn't taste so good.

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