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View Poll Results: best tasting pear

Voters
7. You may not vote on this poll
  • beth

    0 0%
  • beurre hardy

    1 14.29%
  • black worcester

    0 0%
  • clapps favourite

    0 0%
  • concorde

    1 14.29%
  • conference

    3 42.86%
  • doyenne du comice

    0 0%
  • durondeac

    0 0%
  • humbug

    0 0%
  • invincible

    0 0%
  • josephine de malines

    0 0%
  • louise bonne of jersey

    0 0%
  • merton pride

    0 0%
  • moonglow

    0 0%
  • onward

    0 0%
  • sensation

    0 0%
  • williams bon chretien

    2 28.57%
  • winter nelis

    0 0%
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Thread: best tasting pear poll

  1. #9
    FB.'s Avatar
    FB.
    FB. is offline Early Fruiter
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    Quote Originally Posted by genovise View Post
    I would have liked a concorde pear tree Garden Chris but it does nothing but rain here in Greater Manchester so i think pear scab and fire blight would be a big problem for me.

    I would have loved to have a williams pear tree FB and Virginveggrower but i didn't want to take the risk of relying on the next door neighbors pear tree to pollinate it.
    I'd be surprised if fireblight was a problem in the NorthWest - I would have thought that it was usually too cold for fireblight. But perhaps not.......who suggested being wary of fireblight in the NorthWest?

    I find Concorde to have better disease resistance than Conference (which seems to suffer a bit from scab in wet years).
    Pears prefer a warm, sunny, sheltered climate. They are less hapy in cool, dull or wet climates.
    Not all fruits grow well in all areas. Plums thrive in your climate but I can't grow them (not enough rain), whereas pears may not thrive in your climate (too wet and cold).

    The rotten pears you mention on your Conference could be because of scab causing the fruits to split and allowing fruit-rotting fungi to get in.
    .

  2. #10
    FB.'s Avatar
    FB.
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    Quote Originally Posted by VirginVegGrower View Post
    Oops! Pears do grow large and you've got to have a fair sized garden to grow them unless you espalier in some way. Shame you can't have two. The WBC is a beautiful flavour.
    Quince rootstocks need lots of rain. I don't get much of that here, with the result that my ten-year-old pears on Quince A are only about 4-5ft in size.
    I have some younger pears on Pyrus and Pyrodwarf that are already bigger and stronger than the Quince-rooted trees of twice their age and without needing the irrigation/feeding that Quince rootstock does.
    My slightly alkaline soil also doesn't help; Quince isn't entriely happy, but pear rootstocks will cope very well with alkaline soil.
    .

  3. #11
    yummersetter is offline Rooter
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    I've only had a handful of pears this year, and they were pinched by birds or squirrels before they were ripe. I've got 2 Concorde trees which are usually huge croppers of perfectly OK fruit. I planted Gourmande about ten years ago but haven't had any pears from it yet, it hardly grows and has a lot of disease. My Comice tree isn't in a great location and only gives me a couple of dozen pears in a normal year. They're tricky to judge when to pick, how to store and when to eat them but if you get it right there's no finer fruit.

  4. #12
    VirginVegGrower's Avatar
    VirginVegGrower is offline Gardening Guru
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    Quote Originally Posted by FB. View Post
    Quince rootstocks need lots of rain. I don't get much of that here, with the result that my ten-year-old pears on Quince A are only about 4-5ft in size.
    I have some younger pears on Pyrus and Pyrodwarf that are already bigger and stronger than the Quince-rooted trees of twice their age and without needing the irrigation/feeding that Quince rootstock does.
    My slightly alkaline soil also doesn't help; Quince isn't entriely happy, but pear rootstocks will cope very well with alkaline soil.
    Rain is something we have in abundance FB
    Look deep into nature, and then you will understand everything better...Albert Einstein

    Blog - @Twotheridge: For The Record - Sowing and Growing with a Virgin Veg Grower: Spring Has Now Sprung...Boing! http://vvgsowingandgrowing2012.blogs....html?spref=tw

  5. #13
    FB.'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by VirginVegGrower View Post
    Rain is something we have in abundance FB
    The trouble is: Quince likes lots of rain as they have relatively weak and shallow roots, but pears don't like heavy rain - and pears have deep and vigorous roots.
    Grafting the two together is a bit of a mis-match. In fact, a number of pears don't grow well when grafted on quince because the two species are only just compatible.
    It's this poor compatibility that literally starves the pear grafted onto the quince - and stress then increases fruitfulness (although the partial incompatibility between pear and quince will also impair fruit quality due to poor sapflow).
    VirginVegGrower likes this.
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