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Thread: Soft fruit varieties - recommendations

  1. #17
    Can the Man is offline Sprouter
    Join Date
    Jul 2019
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    Kildare, Ireland
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    My first time growing blueberries and I only bought 1 plant, so I understand that I need a minimum of 3 and preferably 2 different varieties. I was planning to grow them in the PT, but looks like I could keep them outside until late winter then move them out again in the spring. I need to make up some kind of net frame to go over them when the berries start growing.
    burnie likes this.

  2. #18
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
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    197

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    Have you thought of white currants? I find them very successful and birds don't like them.

  3. #19
    ESBkevin is offline Cropper
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    Jun 2015
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    Mid Suffolk
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    I'd endorse what others have said. Autumn Rasperries can be long fruiting making them worth the space. They start in year 1 after planting so no waiting and easy maint. Blueberries, I have just one in a pot so I control the ericatious compost conditions, no problems with polination. I shall take cuttings this year. Blueberries also take a while to get good at fruiting, by the third year they are in thier stride. Thornless blackberres espaliered along a fence/wall take up little growing space. I have a blackcurrent bush, well established and produces lots of large fruit. We have space so grow strawberries, but you can get hanging type planters for them to save beds as long as you water regularly, they are short season fruit and not super proplific imho.
    In all cases nets against birds but allowing polination insects are essential.
    Otherwise Rhubarb is easy and a decent crown will produce early fruit well once established and is worth the space. I have 4 gooseberry bushes but am wondering if they are worth the effort and hassel with the thorns.
    burnie likes this.

  4. #20
    burnie is offline Veggie gardener
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    Jul 2006
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    Angus,Scotland
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    A trick I have tried before with Autumn fruiting rasps is when you prune them, cut a few right down as normal and leave a few about half the original height, you then get a few earlier fruits whilst waiting for the main crop.
    ESBkevin and Babru like this.

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