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Thread: Preparing the soil of raised beds...

  1. #25
    rustylady's Avatar
    rustylady is offline Gardening Guru
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    Yes, that won't go very far in a thick layer.

  2. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by greenfingers2014 View Post
    Me and my missus?!
    Apologies........I thought I read that your missus was worried about the leaching........I must have dreamt it..............
    “Gorillas are very intelligent, but they don't have to be as delicate as chimps -- they can just smash open the termite nest,”
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  3. #27
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    GF2014 I have a raised beds higher than the ones you are making made from old scaffold boards which could have been contaminated so I constructed my raised bed on a old greenhouse concrete base before filling I lined the inside of the raised bed with heavy duty polythene, this served two purposes kept any chemicals away from the soil and kept the soil away from the boards and avoided the rotting too quick they have been up five years and I am, now finding that heavy duty poly holds the soil well, and have never had any problem with saturated soil and we have a high rain fall in this area
    F.U.I. I pressure washed the boards before I used them
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    it may be a struggle to reach the top, but once your over the hill your problems start.

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  4. #28
    greenfingers2014 is offline Germinator
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bigmallly View Post
    Apologies........I thought I read that your missus was worried about the leaching........I must have dreamt it..............
    Haha...I thought the intensity of the bed digging had frazzled my brain!!!! Thanks for all your info!

  5. #29
    greenfingers2014 is offline Germinator
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    Quote Originally Posted by rary View Post
    GF2014 I have a raised beds higher than the ones you are making made from old scaffold boards which could have been contaminated so I constructed my raised bed on a old greenhouse concrete base before filling I lined the inside of the raised bed with heavy duty polythene, this served two purposes kept any chemicals away from the soil and kept the soil away from the boards and avoided the rotting too quick they have been up five years and I am, now finding that heavy duty poly holds the soil well, and have never had any problem with saturated soil and we have a high rain fall in this area
    F.U.I. I pressure washed the boards before I used them
    Thanks for the information - its pleasing to hear a success story as I was beginning to worry that my plans were going to fail! Can i ask you what you filled your beds with? At the moment mine are just filled with topsoil (full of worms so im hoping its got some goodness in there!). I do want to improve its condition though as much as possible...

  6. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by greenfingers2014 View Post
    Can i ask you what you filled your beds with? At the moment mine are just filled with topsoil (full of worms so im hoping its got some goodness in there!). I do want to improve its condition though as much as possible...
    If your soil is full of worms I would not worry too much about the quality. When I filled my raised beds I tried to get the poorest soil at the base then as much compost-able material, that was fresh hedge trimmings weeds kitchen waste etc., as I could get on top of that, I topped it of with soil and sand mix as I did not have sufficient soil to top it up some of the sand was builders concrete sand and some burn sand (that`s river sand in case you are wondering) as the the season progressed the level dropped due to settlement and the material decomposing, the top soil depth was about 16ins. and has been topped up every year with the material from my hanging baskets and garden compost. Hope this helps, and if you fancy trying something in the garden, do it or you will never know whither you were right or wrong
    Last edited by rary; 22-01-2014 at 12:14 AM.
    it may be a struggle to reach the top, but once your over the hill your problems start.

    Member of the Nutters Club but I think I am just there to make up the numbers

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  7. #31
    Johan is offline Seedling
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    Greenfingers2014,
    Look at my post under undercover operations : Shadehouse repaired and better.

    I have planted for years in my three permanent beds with sunken concrete panels of 12 inches deep. I dug three inches of manure or compost in annually and get very good results. I have sandy soil that is extremely fatty. It was a huge effort to get it wet in the first time every season or if you let it get dry.

    I have now added 8 inches of timber above the soil and filled it with mushroom compost (the best price and weed seeds free option available). This i dug in with a 12 inch long spade. So my mix is now 1 part of soil and two parts of compost, 12 inches deep and below that my old mix for a further few inches and thereafter the subsoil. This mix must now get alive with worms and bio organisms but it retains water very wel in our climate, it is 500% not fatty and it warms up quickly every day, extending temerature wise my grow day with at least two hours.

    With this 8 inches of timber and the 4 inches of mix below soil level is more than enough for what I need and I do not need deeper timber sides as it will cost an arm and a leg. Twelve inches will be even better if you can afford a proper mix. I believe ark soil will heat up early in your colder climate.

    After I have wetted my soil just to prevent wind blowing anything away, after 24 hours (at 19h10) it was still warm and damp.
    I made this mix for some time in containers and cannot control the tempo of growth of my tomatoes, cucumbers and peppers. So I decided to use the same mix in my beds.
    Regards

    Johan

  8. #32
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    That bag of topsoil you have leftover is asking to be planted with spuds.
    photo album of my garden in my profile http://www.growfruitandveg.co.uk/gra...my+garden.html

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