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Thread: Rundown plots

  1. #9
    Chestnut is offline Tuber
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    Do you have any option to split the plots temporarily? Some sites round us have quarter plots people can start with, so that inexperienced growers can try a small plot for a year before they commit to a larger one. An overgrown plot might be a bit less daunting if smaller?

    If you're very lucky, you might have experienced plot holders who wouldn't mind 'adopting' the other half or 3/4 for a year or two (rent-free in return for clearing it, of course!)

  2. #10
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    Snadger is online now Dundiggin
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chestnut View Post
    Do you have any option to split the plots temporarily? Some sites round us have quarter plots people can start with, so that inexperienced growers can try a small plot for a year before they commit to a larger one. An overgrown plot might be a bit less daunting if smaller?

    If you're very lucky, you might have experienced plot holders who wouldn't mind 'adopting' the other half or 3/4 for a year or two (rent-free in return for clearing it, of course!)
    This plot although quite large is triangular so doen't really lend itsef to splitting unless two triangular plots were made. A local school had the plot and did nowt then someone took it on and stored wood on it.

    It is similar in size and shape to my own plot which I took on as a derelict project. If I didn't have the plot I have, I would certainly have taken it on as it has huge potential!
    My Majesty made for him a garden anew in order
    to present to him vegetables and all beautiful flowers.- Offerings of Thutmose III to Amon-Ra (1500 BCE)

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  3. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Snadger View Post
    There is a site close to ours that has every plot the same size. They all have a clump of rhuibarb, a gooseberry bush and a blackcurrant bush situated in the same position on the plot and you can't move them. Each is a mirror imge of the other. Weekly check are done to make sure their isn't a weed out of place, or that you haven't grown a carrot where a cabbage should be. My idea of purgatory methinks!
    Really, the thought of those sites who make you have your shed painted a particular colour are bad enough, didn't realise some were even more inflexible. I was quite happy to have a blank canvas, wouldn't have wanted a ready made plot as it'd have given me no scope to make it mine.
    Jungle Jane likes this.

    Some of us live in the past, always talking about back then. Some of us live in the future, always planning what we are going to do. And, then there are those, who neither look behind or ahead, but just enjoy the moment of right now.

    Which one are you and is it how you want to be?

  4. #12
    Alison's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chestnut View Post
    Do you have any option to split the plots temporarily? Some sites round us have quarter plots people can start with, so that inexperienced growers can try a small plot for a year before they commit to a larger one. An overgrown plot might be a bit less daunting if smaller?

    If you're very lucky, you might have experienced plot holders who wouldn't mind 'adopting' the other half or 3/4 for a year or two (rent-free in return for clearing it, of course!)
    I've never understood how this works, do you put a lot of effort and work into your starter plot then get promoted to a full plot? If so I'd have found that very demoralising to loose the work I'd done. Alternatively if you get the rest of the plot you're on, what's happening with that land while you prove yourself? All sounds a bit limbo.

    Some of us live in the past, always talking about back then. Some of us live in the future, always planning what we are going to do. And, then there are those, who neither look behind or ahead, but just enjoy the moment of right now.

    Which one are you and is it how you want to be?

  5. #13
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    If they don't want to do any hard graft, having an allotment is probably not for them... they're the ones that'll let a tidy plot go to rack and ruin and then give it up in two years.
    Snadger and Mr Bones like this.
    He-Pep!

  6. #14
    Bill Door is offline Sprouter
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    Never seen a vacant "ready made" plot. I thought that the whole idea of a plot was to have sufficient land to produce veges for a family. I took on a neglected half plot and then, a few years later, took on an overgrown half plot next to it. I had great satisfaction in bringing both plots up to "scratch" and cropping whilst doing so. I have seen people take on other plots during that same time. They have arrived with new tools, barbecues and chairs. Somehow when they left they have made the allotment less "ready made" than when they arrived.

    That said I have seen others turn up with decidedly second hand tools but plenty of ideas and determination. They have succeeded and enjoyed the experience. I don't agree with "regimented" plots or ways of doing things.

    Bill
    Snadger and sparrow100 like this.

  7. #15
    alldigging is offline Early Fruiter
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    It can be really daunting to see a massively overgrown plot. Unless you've got lots of time and energy it's difficult to tackle it.

    Was talking about this with someone off another site. They have a couple of plots not let because they are massively overgrown. One suggestion was a work day for the existing plot holders to clear and prepare the plot to make it less daunting for a new person. I imagine the cost of getting outside help in to renovate plots is prohibitive.

    I'd prefer it if people are realistic about what they think they can tackle else it just gets depressing trying to nudge them along when they are facing a huge piece of scrub land!

  8. #16
    ESBkevin is offline Tuber
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    Perhaps some half plots might suit the less experienced.
    On our (charity owned) site they now require a deposit of 150 to start, if you leave the plot in a mess your deposit contributes to a contractor clearing it. the Deposit is a lot of money to find for a young family starting out and seems to have deterred any more recent applicants. Constructions are strictly limited to a 6x4ft shed, no greenhouses or fences indeed only two years ago were water butts first allowed and colour controlled. Current plot holders have taken on the last two available plots as additional growing space. We other plot holders will put a rotavator over vacant plots to maintain them as reasonable as practical. My own unit had been sprayed & strimmed on one half and rotavated on the other before I got on there. Spray chemical issues aside it made the start seem easier even though I had a bindweed infestation.

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