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Thread: Making and using hotbeds

  1. #1
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    Default Making and using hotbeds

    Hello all,

    I'm looking to grow salads on top of a hotbed over winter.
    Anyone tried this?
    I've read much around extending the seasons, but little is written around all year growing.
    I'm not looking to provide any supplimentary lighting, could this be a problem in a Northern climate?

    Thanks

    Darren

  2. #2
    Norfolkgrey's Avatar
    Norfolkgrey is offline Mature Fruiter
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    Pop in to your local library and get Jack Firsts book on hot beds. He did do courses but can't remember where he was based and I think there is a bunch of videos on youtube.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Norfolkgrey View Post
    Pop in to your local library and get Jack Firsts book on hot beds. He did do courses but can't remember where he was based and I think there is a bunch of videos on youtube.
    Thank you very much.
    I'll search for Jack Firsts book

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    nickdub is offline Early Fruiter
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    Biggest problem is getting enough really fresh manure for the heating effect to be produced - if you keep chickens or other stock you can be probably do it.

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    Quote Originally Posted by nickdub View Post
    Biggest problem is getting enough really fresh manure for the heating effect to be produced - if you keep chickens or other stock you can be probably do it.
    Thanks
    I have chickens, but only a few, possibly looking for more.
    There are a few stables in my area who i reckon will let me loose in the fresh manure, getting a trailer sorted for my car.
    From what ive read, the victorians made massive piles to heat all sorts of things from swimming pools, glass houses and homes. If i add more manure/carbon at regular intervals, i should be able to keep it going for months hopefully from sep/oct time to around may/june and then hopefully use the composted hotbed on my growing area.

    Has anyone tried growing in winter without supplimentary light?

    Thanks

    Darren

  6. #6
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    Slow down, Darren, I can't keep up
    Will your hotbed be in a greenhouse or outdoors?
    Charles Dowding may help - and there's more on his website. https://www.permaculture.co.uk/videos/benefits-hotbed

    What do you want to grow in winter?
    Do you have a greenhouse or polytunnel?
    You don't need supplementary lighting - maybe if you're trying to grow indoors, otherwise grow the things that are are happy in winter.
    Make 2019 the Year of Random Seed sowing
    @realveggiechicken

    All we are saying is..........Give seeds a chance.

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    Norfolkgrey's Avatar
    Norfolkgrey is offline Mature Fruiter
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    Here is an old thread from a grape who done Jacks course https://www.growfruitandveg.co.uk/gr...rse_83953.html

    Another grape makes her beds using the no dig method https://www.growfruitandveg.co.uk/gr...rse_83953.html

    hotbeds are a lot of hassle for just out of season salad leaves. I made several hot beds in tonne bags and they worked well but they really need to be part of your growing practice IMO. Can you not suffice with microveg indoors? or pea shoots?
    MyWifesBrassicas likes this.

  8. #8
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    I think that too much moisture can be a problem as well as too litle light. As compost heats up it gives off water vapour and could cause moulds and fungal growth in an enclosed environment Nothing ventured nothing gained though so hopefully you will have some success.
    MyWifesBrassicas likes this.
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