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Thread: Allotment and newborn baby

  1. #1
    TrixC is offline Rooter
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    Default Allotment and newborn baby

    Weve had our allotment for four years and really enjoy it. Were expecting our first child any day now and people have said oh youll have no time for gardening now. However Id really like to keep the plot going, even if we have to focus on low maintenance crops for a while, Im thinking squashes, potatoes, soft fruit.

    If anyone has any tips or positive stories about gardening with young children Id love to hear them.
    lottie dolly likes this.

  2. #2
    Aberdeenplotter is offline Gardening Guru
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    TrixC, whatever you do to make things easy, keep a patch you can work on. There will be times you may even get to the plot with your little one who will undoubtedly want to sleep leaving you some time to potter and unwind.
    burnie, Snoop Puss, TrixC and 2 others like this.

  3. #3
    Chestnut is online now Tuber
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    A friend of mine took a new allotment when her first was toddling and second arrived a few months later.
    Now the kids are 2/4 and she’s back at work full time, so we get invited round to help/entertain toddlers quite regularly , and sent home with buckets of stuff to preserve/pickle in return for 50% share.

    Low maintenance is good. Growing some crops so the harvesting bit is done during quieter season, nastutiums for ground cover (technically edible for plot inspection purposes - but no one needs to know if you don’t actually eat them).

    Enjoy ��
    burnie, Snoop Puss, TrixC and 1 others like this.

  4. #4
    Atta's Avatar
    Atta is offline Sprouter
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    Och I did it and I think newborn from May till October I was there almost everyday.Sometimes wasnt able do anything more than feed and nappy change sometimes baby slept for almost one hour
    You can grow some green manures to give a soil some rest and give cover for weeds.
    Congratulations on new arrival

  5. #5
    Mark_Riga is offline Rooter
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    As you say 'we', I assume it's not the royal we (you do live in London though) so should be fine. Sooner than you think it will be three of you doing it and your child will learn such a lot on your plot. My grandchild is 4 now and has his own plot in my daughters garden. I think his favorite vegetable is raspberries.

  6. #6
    Grumpy Gardener is offline Seedling
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    Congratulations TrixC,
    If there's an area that you can't maintain for a period of time then just cover it with a permeable membrane. It'll keep it clean until you get back in to the swing of things.
    burnie, Snoop Puss, TrixC and 1 others like this.

  7. #7
    Jungle Jane's Avatar
    Jungle Jane is online now Early Fruiter
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    Congratulations & all the best to you how exciting! You will have time,like people have time to visit friends & family. You might feel tired/exhausted so dont put pressure on yourself take it easy down there,getting one thing done a day is an achievement! Planning will help,a lot of my time is spent wandering around doing nothing,looking at things & one minute of doing the job

  8. #8
    Snoop Puss's Avatar
    Snoop Puss is offline Early Fruiter
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    Squash sounds like a great idea. I've been trying to come up with similarly sprawling plants, but not doing too well. Outdoor melons might not give a crop, but they would look like you were growing something if you were worried about an inspection.

    One option that occurred to me is the brassica family. Seems like an odd suggestion, but you can buy them as plug plants, they can get to a fair size so occupy a lot of space, and shouldn't get too weedy if thickly mulched with hay. Easier to give away a cauli in autumn or winter than a bushel of courgettes in summer, too.

    More importantly, congrats and best wishes.
    Note to self: Getting too old not to have a life.

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