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Thread: Thinking about bokashi

  1. #9
    Couchkiller Woman is offline Germinator
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    Default Bokashi

    I use bokashi composting mostly in the winter when I donít get to my allotment as frequently, but Iím in London and donít have the extremes of temperature you have. I keep the bin outside the back door and the lowest itís been in the last 15 years is -5 and the bokashi seemed okay.

    I bought my original bins and bran from Wigglywrigglers, when they used to do a 23 litre size, which would take us a couple of weeks to fill. You do need to push the contents down quite firmly. Original Organics was the only UK place I could find last year that did the same size bin - and a a reasonable price compared to other smaller bins. I had to replace a bin because I left one at the allotment and the crows pecked holes in the lid 😢. Although they were quite an expensive, the two bins I bought lasted 15 years and one is still going strong.

    Iíve never has a problem with mould as the bran pickles the contents fairly quickly. I have had a real problem with ďcompostableĒ bags. I used to buy ones made from a ďplasticĒ material. After 5 years of throwing them back into the compost bin every year (not the kobashi bin as they donít break down in there), I realised that my understanding of compostable was not the same as the manufacturerís. Theyíre now in landfill where they can compost at their leisure. Instead I now use some made from paper, which rot down really quickly and cost less. I think wrapping in newspaper is an even cheaper idea!
    I do think bokashi is a good idea because I can compost waste that would otherwise go into landfill. Good luck with it!
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  2. #10
    Baldy's Avatar
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    Default

    Would a cheap n cheerful brewing bucket do the job?
    Something like https://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B00F2HZB..._t3_B00ECVX1NQ
    (I'm balking at the prices of the proper bokashi buckets...)
    Presumably its going to depend on how 'air tight' the cheap ones really are?
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    1574 gin and tonics please Monica, large ones.

  3. #11
    toomanytommytoes is online now Seedling
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    Default

    You'd probably need to do a bucket within a bucket, with the top bucket having holes drilled in the base to allow for drainage.
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  4. #12
    Baldy's Avatar
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    yup - got it... ta

    1574 gin and tonics please Monica, large ones.

  5. #13
    Snoop Puss's Avatar
    Snoop Puss is offline Early Fruiter
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    Default

    I'd have thought a brewing bucket would be just the job. But a tap at the bottom is a good idea so you can drain any liquid that accumulates. Something along these lines, so long as the lid is a good fit, which it ought to be for brewing:
    https://www.amazon.co.uk/Litre-Home-.../dp/B01N5UQEWB
    Either that or fit a tap yourself. Those five buckets look to be a bargain, Baldy.

    Wish I'd thought of this idea.

    Stand the bucket on a couple of bricks or other support so you can easily collect the liquid when you open the tap.

    My first bucket has been going for two weeks. It's in a cold corner of the kitchen. So far, I haven't noticed any visual change in the waste. No white mycelium, for example. No liquid either. Early days, I guess. But it certainly doesn't smell, so that has to be a good sign. We eat mainly apples for fruit. I haven't been putting peel and cores in as the dogs love them. In fact, it's hard to even put in carrot and potato peelings, as the dogs like those too! They think I'm stealing from them when I put these peelings in the bucket. I'm using one of those 1 kg yogurt pots as a 'holding pen' for waste before adding it. At least one of those tubs a day goes in.

    I'll be buying bran from Wiggly Wigglers. Compared to the price of bran here, it's a bargain, even allowing for postage.
    Note to self: Getting too old not to have a life.

  6. #14
    veggiechicken's Avatar
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    I'd be hard pressed to find much to put in these bins - orange peel and onion skins would be about it. Everything else is eaten by the dogs or the chooks. It was the same when I had a wormery - poor things.
    Good luck with it, Snoop.
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  7. #15
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    Same here VC - almost all of my peel goes into a pot, gets boiled and turned into porridge with peels for the chickens, and they need it in this cold... or the dog eats it. I'd love a wormery if only I had stuff to feed them
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  8. #16
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    Shh, Sarriss. Don't say that out loud. You're not supposed to give chickens anything that's been prepared in any way in the kitchen, as I understand it. Some kind of law brought in post bovine spongiform whatever to ensure no contamination of animal feed or something like that.

    Our chickens aren't keen on 'real food'. They eat their feed, pluck at grass and love grated cheese, oh and melon seeds. But turn their beaks up at anything else. Very odd.
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    Note to self: Getting too old not to have a life.

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