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Thread: A few newbie questions

  1. #9
    SarrissUK's Avatar
    SarrissUK is offline Cropper
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    What a lovely plot! That's not a pile of junk by the way - that's treasure! Buckets are so useful, and that metal bin can be used for burning stuff, or drowning stuff even. Even buckets with holes in the bottom are useful as pots, or with the bottom taken out to put a collar around tomatoes to 'earth' them up.
    I'm in a similar situation to you, although my plot looks a bit worse than yours... I'm going with the no dig method as I just can't face digging that much, and the no dig method feels very in tune with how nature works
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    Where is you plot? Some suppliers say you can sow into November, but I suspect that is south of here

  3. #11
    Seth L is offline Germinator
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    Every single bucket and both of those bins have had the bottoms removed so not much use for anything but forcing rhubarb or maybe as you say earthing tomatoes. (I discovered this when I picked the bins up and everything inside them fell through the bottom.)

    4shoes I'm in Bristol.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Seth L View Post
    Every single bucket and both of those bins have had the bottoms removed so not much use for anything but forcing rhubarb or maybe as you say earthing tomatoes. (I discovered this when I picked the bins up and everything inside them fell through the bottom.)

    4shoes I'm in Bristol.
    Your probably ok them.
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  5. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Seth L View Post
    Every single bucket and both of those bins have had the bottoms removed so not much use for anything but forcing rhubarb or maybe as you say earthing tomatoes. (I discovered this when I picked the bins up and everything inside them fell through the bottom.)
    Well that sounds like a challenge!

    I'd use bottomless buckets for....
    - earthing up around tomatoes, leeks, celery
    - as worm towers where you basically put in anything you'd put in a composter, to let it break down
    - for growing show vegetables in very fine soil

    What do the rest of you clever grapes think?
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    Jungle Jane is offline Early Fruiter
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    Congratulations & great looking plot,you’ve got loads of growing space some people use bottomless buckets for potatoes,keep everything it might come in handy except bindweed,is that a special compost bin just for the bindweed to keep it away from the usable good compost heaps,nice time of year for planning & prepping (& seed sales!)

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    Welcome to the Vine, an other use for bottomless buckets is containing mint and as there are several different types of mint you could use them for that, as for bindweed definitely go over the compost to remove the roots, and yes I would use the compost,but only on one or two beds, that way it would be easier to monitor for any regrowth which if removed regularly would kill the weed off. One other point make sure you keep your onion a daffodil bulbs well separated daffs are poisonous and its easy to make a mistake
    Seth L likes this.
    it may be a struggle to reach the top, but once your over the hill your problems start.

    Member of the Nutters Club but I think I am just there to make up the numbers

  8. #16
    bikermike is offline Tuber
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    uses of a bottomless bin
    practical jokes?

    Looks a nice plot.

    I've put some field beans in two weeks ago and not seen anything yet, but I'll report back after the weekend.

    the main problem with burning weeds IMO is that they are damp and need wood to get them going - which is generally a waste of wood. However, you seem to have a good pile there for burning, so that would seem an ideal opportunity.
    If you can dig out the compost and get the bindweed out, it's a perfect opportunity to burn it. Don't forget to check your woodpile for hedgehogs before you burn it. Also it's a very good way of clearing weeds - I'd put the fire somewhere you want cleared.

    (For that much, if you are handy at DIY, I'd build a screen (aka a very big sieve), with a piece of mesh that fits over a wheelbarrow with an edge barrier of say 10cm tall round the edges. Then you can put some shovels full on the screen and use the barrow to riddle it back and forth and catch the sieved stuff. The real issue for that is getting fine enough mesh.)

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