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Thread: Where do you get all your No dig Material?

  1. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Billy's lad View Post
    I didnt think there was a lot of value in horse manure as it has a very low nitrogen content
    It doesn't really matter when its being used as bulk to fill a raised bed or as a mulch.
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    My original raised beds are a bit odd, as I have lowered the path as much as raised the bed, ISWIM.

    The newer ones, I am not filling too full in the first instance - my original ones have no freeboard at the top, so every time I mulch them, stuff falls off the sides. I'm not making that mistake again

    I have to admit to buying compost this year (4x175l bags for a raised bed where I am filling entirely from bought). I am hoping not to need to buy compost for this purpose when I've got all the beds up (I buy a bag or two for the greenhouse

    Otherwise - compost - my neighbours on both sides let me take their garden waste bin every week. that ends up being on average 1 full wheelie bin per week (allowing for gluts/missed weeks etc). I have a 2 bay compost bin at the plot each bay one pallet wide. Those two bins keep one bay filling (the other one is rotting down).

    I have a dalek in the garden for my own garden lawn-mowings, prunings, uncooked kitchen waste etc. About half a dalek a year goes to the plot

    I gather "roadkill" leaves once a year (we live on a quiet road) - I've only got two bin-bags so far this year - last year I gathered eight. This was helped by working on a site with grounds last year, and getting some bags of leaves off the maintenance staff.

    I use woodchip. We get it delivered to the site (I don't know where from). I tend to cover unused beds with it, but to fill the new raised beds a bit, what I did was scraped up the chip that has been down for about a year as paths, and put that in.
    Spent compost and growbags go on as mulch

    I think the answer is really just "by any means necessary" - don't take leaves from natural woodland though - that's just robbing their nutrient cycle.
    Don't forget to wee on the compost - every little helps

    I am debating asking my local curryhouse if they'll keep veg west aside for me, but then you have the problem of not collecting it. My coffeeshop is on the station and not open on weekends otherwise I'd ask for their grounds.


    I hope too get some bocking-14 comfrey in as well.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jay-ell View Post
    You hear so much about horse manure - some say it doesn't have enough nitrogen, others that you can't use it fresh as it's too hot, others say it's a perfect carbon to nitrogen ratio for composting, some say you need to add browns to compost it - you wonder who to believe.

    In prior hears I used stable sweepings and it worked great for the spuds in buckets and for the giant pumpkins. This year I've got pure paddock pickings and it's breaking down in the bin - got really hot the first few weeks with turning so must have enough nitrogen in it for that to happen.
    Only thing I can add is

    Horses don't chew the cud so the feed has more seeds in the muck. It is better to get horse muck from a stable with free range chickens and to hot compost.


    Found this....

    Manure Matters: How Manures Measure Up


    There is a table with values for Chicken, horse and cow manure

    As a very rough guide Rabbit has 2.4% nitrogen, then just half each time for Chicken, horse, Cow
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Where do you get all your No dig Material?-capture.jpg  
    Last edited by 4Shoes; 31-10-2018 at 11:54 AM.

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    are diary cows really well organised?

    Thankyou for the figures. Do you know how do those figures compare against compost btw? and are those rotted or un-rotted figures?
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    Quote Originally Posted by bikermike View Post
    are diary cows really well organised?

    Thankyou for the figures. Do you know how do those figures compare against compost btw? and are those rotted or un-rotted figures?
    Expect diary cows figure has more to do with type of feed.

    Note Steer in this country would be beef cattle - same nitrogen content in muck as horses.

    Figures I believe are fresh - uncomposted

    Garden compost is around 1% according to search engine.

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    Quote Originally Posted by 4Shoes View Post
    Only thing I can add is

    Horses don't chew the cud so the feed so more seeds in the muck. It is better to get horse muck from a stable with free range chickens and to hot compost.
    The additional stomachs in cows that help digest the seeds as well. This is why I turned the pile for the first couple of weeks. Two weeks at 60-70 degrees centigrade is going to kill off any seeds and unwanted bacteria (e-coli) and turning it makes sure that all of it gets hot, not just the centre. After that I've just left it to break down itself.

    p.s.

    Horse manure has a carbon to nitrogen ratio of about 30:1 which is the ideal ratio for composting.
    Last edited by Jay-ell; 31-10-2018 at 11:37 AM.

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    I don't think the point of no-dig is to add nutrients?Nutrients COULD be an added bonus depending on what mulch you use but organic fertiliser can also be used prior to planting time. when it will be more beneficial.

    My idea of no-dig is to mulch with some form of organic matter to keep down weeds and to improve the structure of the soil by the worms doing the work of a spade.

    Having said that, in my case I always dig once before adopting a no dig regime. The reason for this is that I don't know what has happened on the plot before I got it?

    It would be pointless practicing no-dig on a compacted bonfire site or on any other surface that had been used as a dumping ground for glass etc.

    I don't actually mind digging but can see no point in doing it after the initial dig. Cardboard is my preferred mulch material but I will utilise whatever organic material I can get.
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    Forgot to answer the question posed in the thread title!

    In my case I have just moved home and all my stuff was and in some cases still is, packed away n cardboard boxes.


    The allotment benefits every time I empty a box.
    Baldy, Chestnut and 4Shoes like this.
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