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  1. #33
    Suzy is offline Germinator
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    Hi everybody, I have learned so much since I first posted. We were at the garden shop the other day and got very confused by the assortment of seeds. Can anybody recommend which are the best or does it not matter. As this is our first allotment any advice greatly received.

    Suzy

  2. #34
    Lesley Jay is offline Early Fruiter
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    Suzy do you have a list of the different varieties available at the garden shop? I can tell you the varieties that I grow that I would recommend. Tell me what types of vegetables you want to grow and I will tell you my favourites.
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  3. #35
    Suzy is offline Germinator
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    Hi, We are hoping for carrots, beetroot, courgettes, onions or any that you could advise for our first allotment crop.

    Suzy

  4. #36
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    andrewo is offline Cropper
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    Quote Originally Posted by Suzy
    Hi, We are hoping for carrots, beetroot, courgettes, onions or any that you could advise for our first allotment crop
    Carrot, beetroot and onions (best with sets, seed can be hit and miss and you really need to start them indoors) can all be planted in situ, from April onwards.

    Courgettes need starting in a propagator (on a windowsill in a three inch pot with clear plastic bag over it will do) and must not be planted out till May after hardening off (any frost and you will lose them, hence May plant out). However, if you're worried you can make a mini cloche from a pop bottle for your courgette (dead easy just cut a big pop bottle in half and use the top and take the screwtop off). Just make sure you plant the courgette in a dish shape e.g. dig a hollow in your soil, disc shape, not deep, just enough to hold water and plant the courgette in the middle.

    Suggest that you also do mixed salad leaves and try some tomatoes outdoors, they do grow especially the yellow varieties.

    Also, potatoes are a great crop, cover a vast area and you can plant radish between them, radish will come up first and then you have two crops from one space.
    Best wishes
    Andrewo
    Harbinger of Rhubarb tales

  5. #37
    Lesley Jay is offline Early Fruiter
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    Hi Suzy for carrots I use Fly Away and Resistafly which the carrot fly do not like. Beetroot I stick to Bolthardy which shouldn't bolt and I find it stands in the ground well. Courgettes I grow Defender which is a green courgette and Gold Rush which produces yellow courgettes. For onions I find that either Setton or Sturton gives good results for the kitchen. With onions to be planted in the autumn and left in the ground over winter I use Radar and Electric. As Andrewo says buy onion sets but don't plant if the ground is cold and wet. Green Valley cabbage is lovely. Lady Di runner beans are tasty and stringless. Blue Lake climbing french beans are really nice and so are the dwarf Safari Kenyan French Bean. Masterpiece Green Longpod or Imperial Green Longpod Broad Beans are great. As Andrewo says do try outdoor tomatoes. Ferline are good as these are blight resistant and outdoor tomatoes do taste and smell really good. These are only a few of the vegetables that I grow but they are all great tasting.
    Last edited by Lesley Jay; 23-02-2006 at 04:03 PM.
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  6. #38
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    andrewo is offline Cropper
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lesley Jay
    Hi Suzy for carrots I use Fly Away and Resistafly which the carrot fly do not like. Beetroot I stick to Bolthardy which shouldn't bolt and I find it stands in the ground well. Courgettes I grow Defender which is a green courgette and Gold Rush which produces yellow courgettes. For onions I find that either Setton or Sturton gives good results for the kitchen
    I grow my carrots under fleece or in raised beds, this keeps the flies away, as does companion planting. As for courgetters I grow Zucchini F1 and vary the varieties each year (plenty of manure for these though). Onions, I love jermor as a shallot but must admit that stuttgart are a dream.
    Last edited by andrewo; 13-03-2006 at 12:25 PM.
    Best wishes
    Andrewo
    Harbinger of Rhubarb tales

  7. #39
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    nick the grief is offline Gardening Guru
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    Get hold of a copy of Joyce Larkoms Book Suzy, it will give you loads of info and is a great read.

    Also, have a word with some of the more senior plotholders, they love feeling useful and they can advise you what grows well on your plots, some of them may even have a few spares for you as well, yuo can't go wrong if you offer to make them a cuppa if you've got a kettle in your shed
    ntg
    Never be afraid to try something new.
    Remember that a lone amateur built the Ark.
    A large group of professionals built the Titanic


    ==================================================

  8. #40
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    Emma is offline Seedling
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    Hi,
    I've just joined the forum and read your message. I got my first 1/2 a plot last winter. It has been the best thing I have done in years and have just taken over another 1 1/2!. The hardest bit about the first year is clearing it and this is the time most people give up. Having never grown anything myself I allowed last year for experience. I grew quite a few things in the end including the most amazing cauliflowers which I had been told were hard to grow. But I used it as a learning experience and as I wasn't expecting much from my first crops I was pleasently surprised when things turned out better that I expected. The most important thing is that you enjoy it and next year armed with a whole year of growing experince then you can get serious! One thing I will say is if you are growing carrots then I would advise you net them with insect netting. As if the carrot fly get in then it will ruin the crop and there is nothing like your own fresh carrots. Good Luck x

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