Grow Your Own Magazine

Navbar button growfruitandveg.co.uk Logo
Forum Navigation

+ Reply to Thread
Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123
Results 17 to 21 of 21
Like Tree26Likes

Thread: Taking on allotment while pregnant with newborn

  1. #17
    Jungle Jane's Avatar
    Jungle Jane is offline Early Fruiter
    Join Date
    Feb 2015
    Location
    Essex
    Posts
    4,878

    Default

    It depends how happy you are in the decision, your intuition will help you decide. May is still a bit cold for some tender plants, you could start things like courgette & cucumbers indoors on windowsills in May, the days will get longer to pop down the plot for an hour (Iíve got photos of 7pm mid May daylight) & dig out a patch of weed & plant potatoes, do this a few times during May, you donít need to clear it all just get a patch ready & cover other areas. June loads can be sowed direct lettuce, rocket, swede, radish, chard, peas & runner beans. It will be nice growing up with the plot & seeing your progress over the years, it can begin when you want. As you grow some things at home already we could talk about that instead & vertical planting to make more of the space, companion planting to get more plants in one container, successional planting & to continually follow crops with other crops. How much garden space do you have tomatoes,peas & beans are very productive for their space,thereís a vertical yellow courgette that might be good in a pot. It might be easier for you at home? Itís difficult to know the future but you might have a feeling of what to do whatís best?

  2. #18
    Plot8B is offline Germinator
    Join Date
    Nov 2019
    Posts
    3

    Default

    I love your train of thought Rary, although LostthePlot8b has a good ring to it right?

    Thank you for your message Jungle Jane, I think I am going to concentrate on trying to maximise my produce in my garden for now with the hope that when I have more time on my side I can get an allotment space.

    The area I have for planting is probably 2-3sqm, so not exactly very big at all but it is in the sunniest position in the garden so it normally grows quite well at the moment I have chard, and a good head of rhubarb in there as well as some raspberry vines, I also use the space for carrots, beetroot and I plan to put some beans at the back next year because my daughter adores beans. I also have a small shelved green house which I use for my tomatoes and seedlings as well as a patio area I use for containers for herbs, salad leaves and potatoes. I have some hanging baskets with strawberries in which do well but I just can't do courgettes for some reason, I know they're supposed to be one of the easiest things to grow but I have a real slug issue and no matter my tactics they head straight for the courgettes and decimate them.
    bramble and Jungle Jane like this.

  3. #19
    Jungle Jane's Avatar
    Jungle Jane is offline Early Fruiter
    Join Date
    Feb 2015
    Location
    Essex
    Posts
    4,878

    Default

    You’re growing a good variety there,slugs are a nuisance they don’t touch my courgettes though I think they prefer my marigolds

  4. #20
    Logunner is offline Rooter
    Join Date
    Aug 2018
    Location
    Newton le Willows
    Posts
    259

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Plot8B View Post
    Thank you all for your replys.

    I would be taking over the plot at the beginning of February and am due in April, so right at the start of the growing season. I've been discussing with my husband and although we think it would be a great idea to bring the kids up on an allotment with the commitment I'm going to have with a newborn and toddler and that fact he works so much it would probably be too much for us for now.

    I'm going to speak to the allotment manager of the council and try and defer our application on the waiting list until this little one is closer to two, that way I think it would be more manageable time wise and both kids should hopefully be at an age where I can manage them and get what I need from the plot as well as ensure I keep up with the requirements to keep our plot. It's a shame, it is a really lovely plot on a lovely allotment, hopefully the fact I was given an offer within a year of my application will mean I won't need to wait too long closer to 2022.

    You could approach the committee and see if there is any help available from other members. If the plot just needs strimming and covering then you may be surprised how little you need to do, especially if you have an understanding committee.

    Try and find a copy of the half hour allotment, it sure helped me when I started..

  5. #21
    TrixC is offline Rooter
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    London
    Posts
    326

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Plot8B View Post
    Thank you all for your replys.

    I would be taking over the plot at the beginning of February and am due in April, so right at the start of the growing season. I've been discussing with my husband and although we think it would be a great idea to bring the kids up on an allotment with the commitment I'm going to have with a newborn and toddler and that fact he works so much it would probably be too much for us for now.

    I'm going to speak to the allotment manager of the council and try and defer our application on the waiting list until this little one is closer to two, that way I think it would be more manageable time wise and both kids should hopefully be at an age where I can manage them and get what I need from the plot as well as ensure I keep up with the requirements to keep our plot. It's a shame, it is a really lovely plot on a lovely allotment, hopefully the fact I was given an offer within a year of my application will mean I won't need to wait too long closer to 2022.
    I have an allotment and an 11 month old baby. Honestly, I think your instincts are right. I had my plot for several years before I had my son, and we were able to keep it going while I was on maternity leave, but it was pretty hard. I don't think I could have taken on a new plot while pregnant and with a newborn, there are just too many physical tasks, particularly if the plot has a lot of perennial weeds. Yes, you can do no dig and cover unused areas with cardboard, but weeds grow so fast, and in my experience on our site newbies who don't manage to get on top of the plot in the first year often find it quite discouraging and end up quitting. Some sites also have rules for the percentage of the plot that needs to be cultivated and you might find it all a bit onerous, when it is supposed to be fun! If you can get a plot in a couple of years that would be better all around.... although trying to work a plot with two young children may have its own challenges!

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts