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Thread: Will concrete wall suck moisture from soil?

  1. #1
    CubanBenny is offline Germinator
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    Default Will concrete wall suck moisture from soil?

    I am planting vegetables in a tin border against a concrete wall .It is one of the last parts of my garden where no vegetables/flowers are growing ;-). However I am concerned with the wall drying out the soil -

    I have heard a wall will suck moisture from the earth - Is this true? If so, I can put a polypropylene sheet between the wall and the earth. I will mulch it too, i'm sure that will help.

  2. #2
    Cadalot's Avatar
    Cadalot is online now Early Fruiter
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    Yes Masonry and Concrete will absorb water.
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  3. #3
    nickdub is offline Sprouter
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    borders against a wall are nearly always dry but warm - this is mainly due to the rain-shadow effect of the wall.

    One way to take advantage of this, is to grow stuff which enjoys this set of conditions eg peaches, grapes or figs.
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    burnie is offline Veggie gardener
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    How old is the concrete, I worry about chemicals leaching into the soil too, I grow non edibles in that situation for a bit till all calms down.
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    CubanBenny is offline Germinator
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    Quote Originally Posted by burnie View Post
    How old is the concrete, I worry about chemicals leaching into the soil too, I grow non edibles in that situation for a bit till all calms down.
    It's about ten years old, and it's painted. It's not exactly a wall - It's a fence with concrete posts and concrete bases for the wooden fence panels to rest on.

  6. #6
    CubanBenny is offline Germinator
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    Quote Originally Posted by nickdub View Post
    borders against a wall are nearly always dry but warm - this is mainly due to the rain-shadow effect of the wall.

    One way to take advantage of this, is to grow stuff which enjoys this set of conditions eg peaches, grapes or figs.
    Unfortunately it's an east facing wall, so I don't think in would be sunny enough to grow any of these, Mediterranean type plants well.

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    Penellype is offline Early Fruiter
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    I have concrete fence posts and gravel boards down the sunny side of my garden and I must admit I hadn't given it a thought. My tomatoes grow fine against the fence as do peas if I plant them there.

    If you are worried why not grow veg in pots against the fence. Plenty of veg will grow really well in large containers and you can move things about easily that way. If you want something bigger, a blueberry bush is quite attractive and a container is a good option for these as they like acid soil.
    A life is like a garden. Perfect moments can be had, but not preserved, except in memory. LLAP. - Leonard Nimoy

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    nickdub is offline Sprouter
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    Probably try a choice dessert variety of plum in that situation and fan train it - can be a real work of art, as long as you have the patience. something like Jefferson's Gage or Kirke's Blue would be examples.
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