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  1. #1
    JustAnotherJez is offline Germinator
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    Default Growing fruit in a woodland/shaded area

    Hi. I have an allotment but it's a small plot and not much chance of anything bigger. The garden is also small and full up. But I do own some woodland so wondering if I can make use of that space for growing. Obviously light is the big issue. There is a track which although not on the edge does get reasonable light as the trees are less dense , especially early in the year. So I'm wondering what could possibly work in that environment.

    My ideas so far include rhubarb being so early and something I just won't have room for at the plot. It seems pretty resilient. Anyone know if deer are likely to take a shine to it?!

    I've read gooseberries can tolerate a little shade, fruit quite early and their thorns might help their survival too.

    Mushrooms might the most natural crop. I'm about to try one of the plug types in logs to see whether they work as reviews don't tend to be very encouraging but I do have lots of fresh logs!

    A veg patch will just get overgrown/munched by rabbits so no point. Any other suggestions or success growing fruit in a shaded area?

  2. #2
    TEB
    TEB is offline Cropper
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    Depending oh how shady but Raspberries are a woodland plant, mine do well in a reasonable shady area.

  3. #3
    Flummery's Avatar
    Flummery is offline Gardening Guru
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    Raspberries and their other rellies (brambles, tayberries, logan berries etc) are good in shade. They are considered woodland plants. You'll have a never ending supply of gorgeous fruit in the summer and the possibility of jams to see you through the winter. Tayberry jam is fantastic.
    Whoever plants a garden believes in the future.

    www.vegheaven.blogspot.com Updated March 9th - Spring

  4. #4
    Snadger's Avatar
    Snadger is offline Gardening Guru
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    If you can maybe do a bit of thinning out of the woodland the above mentioned soft fruit will have a bit more chance. Raspberries should thrive in that enviroment!
    My Majesty made for him a garden anew in order
    to present to him vegetables and all beautiful flowers.- Offerings of Thutmose III to Amon-Ra (1500 BCE)
    Diversify & prosper!


  5. #5
    JustAnotherJez is offline Germinator
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    I didn't know raspberries would tolerate some shade. There are some wild blackberries around already but they don't seem to fruit much but they are in some shady spots. Maybe some cultivated varieties might be better fruiting? The ideal area for maximum light is a bit prone to ferns as well which might be a problem.

  6. #6
    Nicos's Avatar
    Nicos is online now 'Allo 'Allo !
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    Hi there- and welcome to the Vine!
    I'm just wondering about your location- are you in the UK? A wooded area in southern Europe would be much more plant friendly than in the north of Scotland.
    I'm presuming it's a deciduous wood then?
    Deer? Hmm..I'd have thought they'd home in on berries
    Cultivated berries will certainly fruit more than wild ones

    Wild garlic thrives on the edge of woods

  7. #7
    JustAnotherJez is offline Germinator
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    Thanks all. Yes UK, South East England (must add to profile). It's quite a mix of broad leaf and conifer but mainly broad leaf near the ride so gets lots of light in the spring as the oaks seem to take a while to get going. The deer are a issue. I might stick in a few canes in as an experiment this year and see if they manage to establish. Any early fruiting varieties recommended?

    I would love to have a few apple trees but expect they would struggle and better suited to a southern edge in full light but that's not possible.

  8. #8
    Flummery's Avatar
    Flummery is offline Gardening Guru
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    You can be lucky or unlucky with wild blackberries. If you buy a 'tame' one you'll get better fruits.
    Whoever plants a garden believes in the future.

    www.vegheaven.blogspot.com Updated March 9th - Spring

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