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  1. #1
    singleseeder is offline Tuber
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    Default Cages to support tomatoes?

    Whilst trawling utube, I often see that American growers have rolled wire mesh/netting around tomato plants, including the trusses.

    Is this for support or protection? How difficult does this make it to harvest the tomatoes? Does anyone here use this method?

  2. #2
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    Newton is offline Cropper
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    They tend to grow outdoors more because of their climate. I expect they work well for wind protection as well as truss support....God Bless Em

    Loving my allotment!

  3. #3
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    taff is offline Early Fruiter
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    it's for support, for bush and heirloom tomatoes

  4. #4
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    Patchninja is offline Cropper
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    I don't think you need cages for any type of tomato. I grow outdoors and just use a stick or I have some metal spirals.

  5. #5
    Aberdeenplotter is offline Gardening Guru
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    I found a pic on this site Tomato cages . Looks like his cages are very open so wouldn't make cropping difficult. Some rylock fencing wire with the largest mesh upwards would do the trick but that guys cages are 53 inches and rylock I think would be a metre high at most so might need to be suspended on stakes(the guys cages are supported with stakes as well). If I needed to support tomatoes using something that needed a couple of stakes to support, I'd just use the stakes to support the tomatoes as they seem to survive using that method.

  6. #6
    singleseeder is offline Tuber
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    Hmm, something else the Americans do differently then?

    I quite liked the support idea of them, but some I had seen on video clips were much smaller mesh than the one Aberdeenplotter has pointed us to. If I come across any large guage netting being skipped, I might give this a try, just as an experiment.

    Still no one here who has tried it then?

  7. #7
    susieq100 is offline Cropper
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    I made a sort of tomato corral last year at the plot (much to the amusement of some of the 'old boys') and put 3 outdoor tomatoes (Oregon Spring) and 2 gherkins inside it. It worked really well - the toms are a semi bush variety anyway and it gave the gherkins something to cling on to. Acted as a wind break, support for the toms and I was able to put some polythene around it when the weather was unexpectedly chilly. But the diameter of my corral (it wasn't closed enough to be called a cage) was about a metre.

  8. #8
    Tadpole123 is offline Sprouter
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    I tried it on 2 plants years ago after finding the same as you on the web.
    I put a stake in too just in case I needed it and I did. After weeks trying to remove armpits, took wire cutters to it and tied the plant to my stake.
    The bush one was ok in it, kept it in its allotted space better but it annoyed me for some reason.
    Yield was no better, and they don't look nice.

    I also found some Americans growing them on their sides.......let the main stem grow along the ground and the arms grow upwards......that was a waste of time too.

    The British way is best, well for me it is.

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