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Thread: Wormery?

  1. #1
    vegtable newbie! is offline Sprouter
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    Default Wormery?

    Hello!

    Me again - sorry!

    I am debating a wormery!!

    could someone explain to me how they work please? Can you put peelings etc in everyday? Do you get compost and liquid feed out? Is this easy to get out?

    Where's the best and cheapest place to get it from please? Preferably coming with everything it needs!

    Last thing (sorry) I have a baby and very pampered rabbits so I don't want anything with any risk of rats or flys (bunnies can get fly strike - which is horrific). Is there any risk of these with a wormery?

    Thank you so much for your help and sorry for the stupid questions!

    Sue
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    I have the one below
    Wormery?-wormery.jpg

    Tis a recent acquistion, from the city of worms people and is a stacking wormery. Must have had it about two or three months. You could of course, make your own like many grapes have done. This one came with the worms, coir blok and some treat. As it is winter, wiggley woo et al are in some sort of half sleep. They need temps of 10 degrees c to play. Else they go on strike. According to the info that came with it, it can take up to three weeks for a wormery to get up and running. They can eat up to 1kg of food a week. Before they went to sleep, I had put a bit of veggie peelings in each corner. This was then covered with moist shredded paper. I am very happy to say, that I have witnessed wiggly woo et al make some lovely compost. It came as a shock, since i had left the darlings along for a good few weeks. I like them, they are another composting thing. I'm sure someone with more knowledge will be along shortly

  3. #3
    TrixC is offline Germinator
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    I was lucky to get a cheap wormery a few years back because my local council was subsidising them as part of efforts to encourage people to compost - you might want to see if anything like this is available in your area. Otherwise, you can buy sets from wiggly wigglers with everything you need; I've found them to be a very reliable company although not sure how their prices compare to others.

    Basically the way the wormery works is a stack of trays with a sump at the bottom. You add worms and waste in the bottom tray, with a mat or newspaper over the top to keep the moisture in. Over time (a couple of months in our house) the worms will eat the waste and turn it into worm casts, which make a brilliant compost, or can be soaked in water to make a liquid feed for plants. Once the bottom tray is full you add a new tray on top - there are holes in the trays to allow the worms to migrate upwards to eat the new waste you are adding. Once you've harvested the compost from the bottom tray, that tray is ready to go back on top as needed.

    My sense is that the purpose built wormeries work best for smaller households - putting small amounts of peelings etc in every day is ideal, but if you have a large family and want to use it for all your green waste (or create large amounts of compost for your garden) a traditional compost system might be better. Compared to a compost bin the wormery has some limitations in terms of what you can put it in - it's best to avoid cooked food (worms won't eat), onion or citrus peelings (too acidic) or garden waste (too bulky). You're highly unlikely to have problems with rats as they can't get into the system. I do find it attracts fruit flies in the summer, and small numbers of house flies; not the large bluebottle kind though. There are various things you can add to the wormery to manage the fly issue, but in my experience it's difficult to keep them out altogether.

    For someone with a small garden I've found the wormery has a number of advantages over a compost system. It takes up a lot less space, can be sited almost anywhere (mine is on a paved patio), doesn't smell or attract rats. The main disadvantage is that it takes a bit more work and maintenance - if you want happy worms you have to be prepared to check it every week or so to manage the moisture and acidity levels. If you want to keep the worms working over winter you'll also need to add some form of insulation in winter, such as bubble wrap.

    Good luck!

  4. #4
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    donnakebab is offline Cropper
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    I know nothing about wormeries except they make excellent compost/soil conditioner but seem to be hard work.

    When I was a pre school toddler I used to follow my mum when digging the garden, pick up the worms and feed them to our chickens. I love them (worms and chickens).

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    vegtable newbie! is offline Sprouter
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    Hello

    Thank you very much for all your responses!

    I was looking at this one with pack E - what do people think please?

    Wormcity Wormery 75 *Value*

    Would I need an extra kg of worms though?

    Thank you so much

    Sue
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  6. #6
    vegtable newbie! is offline Sprouter
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    Can anyone tell me please if wormeries are hard work? Are they very time consuming? I (naively) think that it's just chucking some peelings etc in and closing it and then just taking off the liquid feed and the compost when needed! Please do correct me

    Sue
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  7. #7
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    Wormcity post here and are very helpful. I'd probably suggest dropping them an email though, or giving them a call tomorrow - it is their business so they'll know exactly the answers that you're looking for

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    That's similar to mine, and I'm happy with the 500g of wiggle woo's. Remember, they do go forth and procreate if you keep them happy. For a family of five, they play all right for us so far. As for the worm liquid. I've heard mixed reviews. I've yet to see any. As the likely hood of it being produced is dependent on the amount of paper and bread that you may put it in. Certain food waste will create more or less worm liquid. Wormeries need a little bit of attention and care, I am still learning! The wiggly woo's have been sat there covered in layers of sheets, with the wormery stuffed full of shredded paper. I will be checking them over the spring through my fingers.

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