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Thread: Mulberry or Medlar trees anyone?

  1. #1
    noviceveggrower is offline Early Fruiter
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    Default Mulberry or Medlar trees anyone?

    Hi everyone,
    Was looking for something different for the allotment or at home for growing. Came across medlar trees and mulberry trees ages ago.
    Don't know anyone who has any of these. I know what a book says about something can be totally different to what can and does happen with growth and fruit.
    Any advice or help very welcome.
    Thanks

  2. #2
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    Alison is offline Gardening Guru
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    Mulberry trees are lovely but get big and it seem to remember that they take an age to fruit. I didn't have the space so bought a quince instead.


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    I have a medlar tree, but seeing as I've only had it two weeks I'm not much use to you at the moment
    Feral007 and ancee like this.

  4. #4
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    Ive got a medlar but not had it long...I woukd like a mulberry but no room
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  5. #5
    yummersetter is offline Rooter
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    I have medlars, mulberries and quinces. The medlar is a pretty tree and the fruits are unusual but finicky to prepare once they've bletted. Half a teaspoon of pulp from each, so no use if you're starving. The mulberries are taking a long time to get going, I've planted them in three places and three of them haven't 'woken up' in the spring after planting, so I've replaced them the following year. The two from last year that are still alive only grew about a foot over the year. I have a replacment for the third position that I've put in a pot in a sheltered place to try planting next spring.

    I have two quinces that are troublefree except for a bit of fungal rust on the Meeches tree. Pretty trees, attractive flowers, and last autumn I had about three barrowfuls of fruit, good for baking, preserves, freezing and swaps, also make the house smell wonderful whilst they're ripening.

  6. #6
    digon is offline Seedling
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    Quote Originally Posted by yummersetter View Post
    The mulberries are taking a long time to get going, I've planted them in three places and three of them haven't 'woken up' in the spring after planting, so I've replaced them the following year. The two from last year that are still alive only grew about a foot over the year. I have a replacment for the third position that I've put in a pot in a sheltered place to try planting next spring.
    My black Mulberry tree is about 5ft high with a lovely shaped canopy but has only grown about 4" per branch, since I planted it two years ago, despite being pampered.
    The first leaves do not appear on mine until (late?) June so it looks dead compared to the other trees around it in spring.
    When I ordered it the advert said 3- 3.5m fully grown but other places I've seen them described as large trees so not sure if there are different size varieties available?

  7. #7
    BertieFox's Avatar
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    We planted a medlar just a couple of years ago and had the first reasonable crop just last autumn. They are pretty little trees and the blossom is attractive in spring, and don't get very big.

    The fruit is quite difficult to deal with and all that 'bletting' is not easy to achieve without them going beyond the point of no return but there is nothing quite like medlar jelly. If you have space for one, I would definitely recommend it as it is trouble free and will grow in a good range of soils.

  8. #8
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    I have a twenty year old mulberry tree, about 15 ft high, and, although it's pleasant enough to look at, the yield of mulberries has never exceeded a couple of kilos. They are fiddly little fruits and I use them for making mulberry jelly, but the flavour doesn't hold a candle to redcurrent jelly. So, personally, I wouldn't recommend one if you're looking for large quantities of tasty fruit. That said, Iv'e seen a few examples of very productive older mulberry trees. I suppose it depends how long you are prepared to wait and what your priorities are.

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