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  1. #1
    cully_c is offline Germinator
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    Default Fruit Trees in Scotland

    Second question of the night.

    I live in South Lanarkshire in Scotland and on a rather exposed hill. I have an area that is sheltered which should do for fruit trees but I am not sure which species would be best.

    I want to plant apples (eating), plums and cherries so what species of each would be best for our lovely Scottish weather? I am looking for about 6 trees this year.

    If anyone has any other ideas of fruit trees that are good or they've had success with let me know too.

    Thanks

  2. #2
    FB.'s Avatar
    FB.
    FB. is offline Early Fruiter
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    Plums and cherries (and pears) flower quite early in spring and are therefore vulnerable to frost killing the blossoms. Frost damage to the bark of plums and/or cherries can allow cankers to develop.
    Cherries are more difficult than many fruits because many varieties of cherry require a specific variety to pollinate them. There are a few self-fertile cherries though.
    Apples flower later than most fruits (some apple varieties flower very late), so are more reliable.
    But Scotland is infamous for being cool and wet, which often causes severe problems with scab and canker of apple trees.

    I think that you have a difficult task ahead of you, so I suggest not to hurry your decision and to take a look around your local area and see what types of fruit actually doing well.

    I suspect that you'll end up looking at some old Scottish varieties of apple that are able to tolerate the harsh weather. The pear variety "Hessle" also used to do quite well up North.

  3. #3
    littleexperience is offline Seedling
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    cully i may be of some help im in a similar position i stay 1000ft asl in the hills in east ayrshire and i grow apples,plums and cherries but the 2 types of pears i tryed died this spring so you may be better of not trying pears but my opal and victoria plum trees usually give be good crops my sunburst cherry tree is also reliable my 2 apples egremont russet and red falstaff always give heavy crops with very little or no scab each year hard to beleive considering we get 6-7 ft of rain here every year possibly dew to the quality of fresh air i have up here so you have nothing to worry about

  4. #4
    cully_c is offline Germinator
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    East Ayrshire, you can't be far from us here in South Lanarkshire. I know many people grow plums in the Clyde Valley but I have no idea what type they grow and we are up on a hill above them!

    Thanks for the ideas on which types of fruit trees you have tried. The only tree I have ever had was inherited with our last house in Falkirk and it was a conference pear tree, don't know if you've given them a go? Although our one was in a nice sheltered town garden which probably helped no end!!

  5. #5
    Mell is offline Banned
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    appletreeman.co.uk is in Perthshire they might be able to help you with ideas

  6. #6
    littleexperience is offline Seedling
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    yes cully i had a conference and williams variety of pears both were about 5-6 years old and they did fruit for a few years both trees did come to life this spring just as normal even after the terrible winter we had. but just when they were about to flower they both just died for some reason. i put it down to the very cold winds this spring which killed them. i think we would be better sticking to plums and apples they can withstand a lot colder conditions

  7. #7
    burnie is offline Tuber
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    James Greive is the most popular apple in Scotlands garden centres due to it being a later flowering type.I can however confirm the scab problem,unless you want to spray with chemicals(I don't),bare this in mind.

  8. #8
    BUFFS is offline Cropper
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    i am in n.ayrshire and the trees are exposed to very strong and persistant winds,i have egramont russet and bramley cropping well each year,james grieve gave good apples this year (its first crop),victoria plums are great,pears will improve when i plant another tree,cherries have proved to be a waste of space so far but i will give them another year,just in case, braeburn apples have proved to be a magnet for scab,again,so good luck with it...

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