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Thread: coralling raspberries

  1. #1
    bikermike is offline Cropper
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    Default coralling raspberries

    As someone said, they are great escape artists, and haven't read the plan for the plot (or they have and are choosing to ignore it). Next door to them is where I want to plant my asparagus.

    Anyway, I have an old scaffolding board that is too rotten to hold any weight, but is still whole. If I sink that into the ground will that c6" barrier do anything to deter my errant soft fruit from encroaching whilst my asparagus get a bit of a start?

    Also, I've completely forgotten - is it summer rasps that sprout from old wood and autumn from the ground or vice-versa?

  2. #2
    Thelma Sanders is offline Gardening Guru
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    will that c6" barrier do anything to deter my errant soft fruit from encroaching
    Not really.
    is it summer rasps that sprout from old wood and autumn from the ground
    Summer rasps fruit on on last year's wood.
    Autumn rasps fruit on shoots grown this year from the ground if they were pruned, but will also produce some fruit on last year's wood if they weren't cut down.

    If both types are cut to the ground they will both grow new canes, but only the Autumn fruiting types will fruit this year.

  3. #3
    bikermike is offline Cropper
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    Quote Originally Posted by Thelma Sanders View Post
    Summer rasps fruit on on last year's wood.
    Autumn rasps fruit on shoots grown this year from the ground if they were pruned, but will also produce some fruit on last year's wood if they weren't cut down.

    If both types are cut to the ground they will both grow new canes, but only the Autumn fruiting types will fruit this year.
    thanks for that.
    In my other raspberry bed I have just planted one new summer and one new autumn - usual garden centre pot with a few canes about 18" tall. One is sprouting from the base, and the other is sprouting from the old canes - is this indicative of anything? (apart from the willfulness of raspberries?)

    How deep would a barrier want to be for deterrent purposes would you think?

    Also, how robust are the bits that pop up - would they be likely to survive if transplanted to an approved location?
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  4. #4
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    roitelet is offline Early Fruiter
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    I think you might need the sort of barrier that is used for bamboo!
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    Gardening requires a lot of water - most of it in the form of perspiration. Lou Erickson, critic and poet

  5. #5
    muck lover is offline Tuber
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    coralling raspberries-3a292e86-0bff-4c76-9423-180e30d35f38.jpgThe errant canes will grow if you dig them up and plant in a wanted spot. They are quite tough. If you have a corner you arenít using you could try them there. You might be pleasantly surprised how well they do. Outing to lose. My autumn raspberries are finally growing after a long winter.

  6. #6
    Kirk is offline Cropper
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    I would seperate the summer and autum fruiting ones. They will form one bed and working out wihich is which is impossible. You do not want to cut dow the summer ones each year.

    I find they can throw out a runner/new cane several feet away. They are very good escape artists.
    BUFFS and Thelma Sanders like this.

  7. #7
    bikermike is offline Cropper
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    The ones in the main bed, I have no idea if they are summer or Autumn, I bought them from Aldi and shoved them in. Is there any surefire way of telling?

    If I cut them all down to ground level over winter, I will presumably either get no fruit or lots of fruit next year (and thus be able to tell)?

  8. #8
    nickdub is offline Early Fruiter
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    These easiest way would be the name of the variety from the label - without that, you'll just have to wait and see how they go.

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