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  1. #9
    FB.'s Avatar
    FB.
    FB. is offline Early Fruiter
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    Quote Originally Posted by Balaji View Post
    Thanks for reply. Appreciate if I could any recommendations on what could be grown.
    Before you decide which varieties, you need to decide which rootstock.
    The roots are more important than the above-ground part of the tree; the above-ground part is useless if the roots can't cope with the soil or climate.

    So before going any further, you need to answer;

    How big do you want them to get?

    How far off the ground do you want the lowest branches to be?

    How deep is your topsoil? Or will they be grown in pots?

    Does your soil tend to waterlog?


    I once planted on MM106, St.Julien A and Quince A - but despite what "the books" say, they are almost un-growable in my soil; 5ft in ten years if I can actually keep them alive.
    On the other hand, Orangepippin has a MM106 of a similar age to me, but it thrives in his location and is about three times the size of mine.

    Why the difference?
    Because I have shallow, dry/fast-draining, sandy soil with a hint of chalk and not usually much rain in summer.
    On the other hand, Orangepippin has deep, fertile, moisture-retentive soil and (from the plants point of view) a nice balance of sun and rainfall.
    .

  2. #10
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    Once you've sorted the rootstocks, I, personally, would include the following in my shortlist (but note that you may need to make provision for pollination partners):

    Apples:
    Irish Peach
    Ard Cairn Russet
    Ashmead's Kernel
    Katy
    Gravenstein
    Tower of Glamis
    Kidd's Orange Red
    Jupiter
    Laxton's Epicure
    Beauty of Bath
    Discovery
    Scotch Bridget

    Pears:
    Hessle
    Jargonelle
    Louise Bonne de Jersey
    Marguerite de Marillat
    Bristol Cross
    Merton Pride
    Baronne de Mello
    Nouveau Poiteau
    Marie Louise


    Plums:
    Opal
    Kirke's Blue

    Cherries:
    Anything you fancy because the birds will eat them before they ripen enough for humans to eat.

    .
    Last edited by FB.; 04-03-2013 at 12:57 PM.
    .

  3. #11
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    Hi Balaji. Welcome to the forum. Nice to have another Northern light on the forum.
    Quanti canicula ille in fenestra ?

  4. #12
    Balaji is offline Germinator
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    Thanks all for the wonderful responses. I will keep this post updated of the progress I make.

  5. #13
    FB.'s Avatar
    FB.
    FB. is offline Early Fruiter
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    Quote Originally Posted by Balaji View Post
    Thanks all for the wonderful responses. I will keep this post updated of the progress I make.
    You must choose a suitable rootstock to match your soil, otherwise the trees might grow too much or too little. Rootstock choice is absolutely crucial - don't underestimate.
    Worry about the rootstock first, then see which varieties are available. Otherwise you may end up having to replace them if they are too weak to fruit, or at the other end of the scale put all their energy into growing and not fruiting.

    For example: in my poor soil, no matter how wonderful the variety, if it is on MM106 rootstock it will not grow well - probably not grow at all and may be difficult to keep alive. So I'd rather have a "lucky dip" on MM111 or M25 rootstock which I can be confident will cope with my soil, than to have even the most perfect variety on an unsuitable MM106 which will not cope with my soil.
    .

  6. #14
    orangepippin is offline Rooter
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    FB - the original post says "I have a small garden at my backyard in Aberdeen". On that basis I think M25 and MM111 are too big. I would choose dwarfing rootstocks (you won't be surprised!) which will allow more fruit trees to be grown in a smaller space. As long as the soil is good, and the trees are supported, mulched, fed, watered, they should be very successful.

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